Wednesday, June 13, 2012

The Defining Moment

I had a defining moment last week, a phone call that literally brought me, pragmatism and all, to my knees.  Trying to help, which was pretty much impossible, I ended up with a boatload of extra kids, fielding questions I didn't know how to answer.  The house is quiet know for the first time since last Tuesday.  My kids are enjoying the last week of school (exams and all) and my niece and nephews are back at home. I sit here, in a kitchen of purely beautiful silence, only to find myself harboring a completely different view of the world.

Now don't get all excited . . . I am still pragmatic, snarky and completely obsessed with Cool Mint Cliff Bars. I still drink way to much coffee, stare at twitter in awe wondering why anybody would be interested in a picture of what John Doe bought at the supermarket, and struggle most days to think up blog topics.  My goals (and obsessions) are still the same; they've just been realigned.  I still want to be published in the traditional sense, and I will continue to push myself to be a better, stronger writer as a result of that goal. I will no longer worry about trends or where my manuscripts lie in that crest.  I take a step closer to the edgy line most of my manuscripts walk and not worry about what some might think.

Most importantly, as I tackle the last of my revisions in preparation for submission, I will remember  that one bad critique or rejection does not define me as a writer.  I will write because I want to, because it brings me a sense of emotional release. That is why I started down this crazy publishing path in the first place, and that is what I am circling back to.

13 comments:

  1. That's exactly my philosophy too. It's the one that I hope will help me achieve my goal. :)

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  2. Very well said. I couldn't have put it better.

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  3. Yay for writing for yourself! It really is the best feeling. Good luck!

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    1. Thanks, Meredith. The neat thing is that as soon as I remember who and why I started writing in the first place, the ideas started flowing.

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  4. I truly believe that the authors who set out writing for themselves are the ones who achieve success. Your best writing comes forth when you forget the market, publishing trends, and what others think and just write the story that wants to be written. Good for you, Trisha!

    I hope everything is okay now with your family. Wishing you many blessings!

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  5. that's the way to go. Good luck with submissions. And like you said, one rejection doesn't define you as a writer.

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  6. Replies
    1. Yes, you are smiling now, but remember, you are the person who has to read my manuscripts as they grow closer to the edge. So make sure you have both tissues and a nice bottle of scotch ready for your next beta read :)

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